Books

A classic memoir, “Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!” has remained one of the most influential personal finance and investing books since it was first published over 20 years ago. In it, author Robert Kiyosaki shares his story of growing up with “two dads”—his real father and his best friend’s father, or his “rich dad”—and how both men influenced Kiyosaki’s views on investing. Candid and inspirational, this book challenges the myth that you need to earn a high income to become rich, explains the differences between working for money and making your money work for you, and more.

John C. Bogle is credited with creating the first-ever index fund, so he surely knew a good bit about investing. He was also the founder of Vanguard Group, and it was rumored that he and Buffett were the best of friends. Buffet even gave his endorsement to Bogle’s book, saying that “investors large and small” should read it.”The Little Book of Common Sense Investing: The Only Way to Guarantee Your Fair Share of Stock Market Returns” takes the surprising approach that for many investors, the stock market is a lose-lose

This No. 1 New York Times bestseller is written by one of Time magazine’s 100 most influential people in the world. An average, middle-class kid who grew up in Long Island, Ray Dalio began his investment firm in his New York apartment. Forty years later, Fortune named his company, Bridgewater Associates, one of the five most important in the U.S. “Principles: Life and Work” is part autobiography, part instructional. Dalio shares his secrets and insights and explains how businesses, individuals, and organizations can adopt them, including a set of rules for applying them to investing, life, your business, and your finances in general.

Your Survival Guide to the Hades of Wall Street The Devil’s Financial Dictionary skewers the plutocrats and bureaucrats who gave us exploding mortgages, freakish risks, and banks too big to fail. And it distills the complexities, absurdities, and pomposities of Wall Street into plain truths and aphorisms anyone can understand.An indispensable survival guide to the hostile wilderness of today’s financial markets, The Devil’s Financial Dictionary delivers practical insights with a scorpion’s sting. It cuts through the fads and fakery of Wall Street and clears a safe path for investors between euphoria and despair.Staying out of financial purgatory has never been this fun.

Returns” takes the surprising approach that for many investors, the stock market is a lose-lose proposition. Bogle then explains.

what he learned to turn the odds in his favor. This isn’t his only book, but it’s the one that covers his own personal innovative techniques and truths in a relatively short and easy read.

Before his death, “The Intelligent Investor” author Benjamin Graham was a renowned professor known as the godfather of investing, and Jason Zweig, The Wall Street Journal columnist, adds in some commentary in this revised edition. This book takes a different approach from other investing books, although it’s not without positive encouragement. It won’t tell you how to make millions, but rather how not to lose your shirt. The authors impart must-read basics to get you started in investing and keep you going for a long time, from recommended strategies and how to analyze stocks to a comprehensive history lesson on the stock market. Graham published the first edition of this book in 1949, and even Warren Buffett has called that version “the best book on investing ever written.”

In “One Up On Wall Street: How to Use What You Already Know to Make Money in the Market,” author Peter Lynch says it’s not only possible for newbie investors to do as well as—if not better than—the pros, but he maintains they already have everything it takes right at their fingertips. Lynch believes that solid investment opportunities are everywhere. They litter the ground at our feet and we just have to stop walking so fast, pause in our everyday lives, and bend down to inspect the clutter so we can pluck out the most viable options. In doing so, we can beat the pros to the punchline and get in on an investment before the rest of the world realizes its potential. “One Up on Wall Street” has sold more than 1 million copies since its release in 2000.

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